Auto Copy in Google

I, like many teachers, like to share my creations and ideas. I believe that when we share – freely, not paid for (this is a different rant) – that we build a strong community of teachers. We want our students to collaborate, so we should be setting that example. As always, two heads are better than one.

Okay, now that my rant is over I will get back on topic. Some of you may have been in a session where the presenter wanted to share his/her work. If that work is on a GSuite product, like docs or slides, when you went to the URL you may have seen this screen:

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Auto Copy

If you have, you know that you simply select the blue ‘Make a copy’ button and your own copy is made in YOUR Drive! So easy! Here’s how it’s done:

Find the word ‘edit’ in the URL of your doc or slide or spreadsheet. Then replace the word ‘edit’ with ‘copy’.

copy 3copy 4 That’s it. Now take that URL and use a URL shortener like goo.gl (Google) or bitly  to share with others. When sharing, even this way, make sure that your document is viewable to others in your share settings. I like to have ‘anyone with the link can view.’

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One final note. I have noticed that when many people (maybe 50+) are trying to copy your document with this method at once, it is unsuccessful. A message appears stating that the item isn’t available. This was a fun fact I learned during a presentation (the first time I thought it was a fluke) and then later at another presentation. So this method works best with smaller groups or when sharing on your blog.

‘Explore’ in Google Docs

Late last week, I was creating a Hyperdoc for my students. I needed an image so I did my usual and went to Tools>Research. And that’s when I noticed it… Research was MISSING! I’ll admit it, I did panic a bit.

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Then I noticed ‘Explore’ was new. So I clicked on it. Note: I say when curious, or in doubt, click on it. It’s not like I’m going to break the internet. And when it get too scary, exit out. That’s when the sidebar I was looking for appeared. Albeit a little different looking than what I’m used to, but it was there!

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Some of the features are a bit different. I do like that I, and my students, no longer have to filter our image search to ensure that they are free to use. Now, Google finds the free to use ones. And just like before, when I drag the image into my document it automatically cites it for me. However, instead of the footnote that it use to be, it is now cited directly below the image.

The feature to cite a website is missing, hopefully, it will return. I do like the ‘Drive’ feature. This searches my drive for all items matching my search query.

Other ways to access ‘Explore’

Keyboard shortcut: (Mac) – command+option+shift+I
(PC) – control+alt+shift+I

Icon on bottom right of screen:

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Have fun Exploring!

Google Scholar

Recently my dad called, what he calls Google, (that would be me, the one with a computer) to do some research on a procedure for him. I started by doing my regular search on Google ‘Web’ when I quickly decided that I wanted something a little more scientific. This is when I switched over to Google Scholar.
Google Scholar logo
What is Google Scholar? Well, it’s ‘scholarly literature’. It takes out all the blogs, ads, and propaganda and only shows ‘scholarly research’. Since my dad was interested in a medical procedure, I figured looking at the raw data and statistics was better than looking at what the medical companies had to say.

Why talk about Google Scholar? I figure it’s one of those lesser known Google tools. It’s great for high school students and beyond. Since you can use various filters, it won’t be hard to find the information you are searching for. I’m sure when I begin my next Master’s program, this will become one of my best friends!

Filters available with Google Scholar:

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