#MathReps

About a year and a half ago I began imagining how Jon Corippo‘s 8 p*ARTS of Speech might look in a math classroom. That’s when I started on my journey of #MathReps. It was small, and originally just for me. I had no problem sharing it and did so freely. Since then, I have been encouraged to expand to other grades. Working with other teachers, I have begun creating and collecting #MathReps for grades K – 8. It is an ongoing process.

#MathReps Example

Feel free to share with others. All credits are given to those that helped. And to them, I thank you!

MathReps: 1st Grade

Last year I created some 5th-grade math protocols. Simple pages students could fill in to help solidify and keep up previously learned skills. This year, I decided to create grades K – 8. A friend and I got together this weekend and hammered out the beginning of 1st grade. And, we gamified it! The directions and gameboards are in Google Slides. This allows you to copy it and customize it.

I also created a video, based on the 1st-grade teacher’s recommendation. Thank you Cris McKee!

I’d love to hear how you use it. Have suggestions for other 1st-grade MathReps? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

Place Value Basics

Last year, I began using Jon Corippo‘s 8 p*ARTSĀ . I saw great success with the repetition. As a result, I thought I’d like to do something along similar lines with Math. Now, I will admit, what I came up with isn’t nearly as fun. However, the repetition is there. This is for 5th grade and can easily be modified for other grades. Here’s what I came up with.

Place Value Basics

The plan:

  • Today’s Number – Have the student of the day decide on the day’s number anywhere from billion to thousandths place. However, the number must be at least to the tenths place.
  • 10 times greater – Take the original number and make it ten times greater.
  • 100 times greater – Take the original number and make it one hundred times greater.
  • 1,000 times greater – Yup, take the original number and make it one thousand times greater.
  • Add 10 times greater and 100 times greater – add the numbers.
  • Write a number that is GREATER – Have students change ONLY a digit that is AFTER the decimal.
  • 1/10 times less – Take the original number and make it ten times less.
  • 1/100 times less – Take the original number and make it one hundred times less.
  • Subtract 1/10 and 1/100 – subtract the numbers.
  • Write a number that is LESS – Have students change ONLY a digit that is AFTER the decimal.
  • Prime factors of the first 2 digits of the whole number – Only take the numbers in the ones and tens place and find the prime factors.

An example is given on the second slide. This should be done daily, with an assessment each week. The first week or two should be done as a group until the class understands what is expected. Once they ‘get the hang of it’ all that is needed is the number and the students can do this independently.